To that end, I am now looking at moving my budding domain before my first month on WA expires (sunk cost, oh well) and am thinking WP will be my best choice, price-wise; not being rich but still better than $360/year just to be part of a “community” of cheerleaders. I have my niche, I want to do affiliate marketing as well as a blog, and potentially an unrelated blog. I will find my own training and education in due time for a lot less $$$…I know a lot of people.
You'll also need ecommerce software, fulfillment software, worry about warehousing, customer service and refunds. But that's not all. You'll also need traffic. Think search engine optimization, Facebook ads, and other social media campaigns. It is hard work, especially on your own. You could opt for Amazon's platform, which might be the easier route. But, then again, at the end of the day, this is a serious business, which could produce significant profits. So you're either all in or you're not. 
26. Services – You can offer a paid service, such as life coaching, blog coaching, goal setting or financial planning. Just be sure to investigate all the legal implications and make sure you’re not claiming to be a professional if you’re not one. With a service like this, you’re basically using your blog to sell yourself. You’ll need to convince people that you’re worth buying and then be able to back up your claims once they purchase your service.

Webinars are quite possibly one of the most potent ways you can make an exorbitant amount of money online. You'll need an audience to train and you'll need to know what you're talking about. Of course, this usually requires having a website and some semblance of an online presence. However, people can still do webinars without all of that. For example, you might have a sizable social media following and you train them every week on something to do with social media. But you will need a product to embed and sell at some point. Don't worry about it in the beginning. In my experience, the best webinar platform out there is GoToWebinar. 
Cookie stuffing involves placing an affiliate tracking cookie on a website visitor's computer without their knowledge, which will then generate revenue for the person doing the cookie stuffing. This not only generates fraudulent affiliate sales but also has the potential to overwrite other affiliates' cookies, essentially stealing their legitimately earned commissions.
Good news is, Wealthy Affiliate goes on to say that within the first few lessons you’re going to learn the techniques that will allow you to get an abundance, no wait…ABUNDANCE of relevant customers to your site by way of organic search. Most folks reading this have no idea just how difficult this is. If you know how to do it, then it’s mainly just hard work, but for those of you that don’t understand the process…you’re in for a long education full of trial and error.
There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned.
Affiliate marketing is also called "performance marketing", in reference to how sales employees are typically being compensated. Such employees are typically paid a commission for each sale they close, and sometimes are paid performance incentives for exceeding objectives.[25] Affiliates are not employed by the advertiser whose products or services they promote, but the compensation models applied to affiliate marketing are very similar to the ones used for people in the advertisers' internal sales department.
Hi Amol, You can’t really expect to make it as an affiliate without a blog, e.g., content strategy. You don’t necessarily need to ‘blog’, but you would need to continually add new content – whether it be evergreen content, product pages with detailed descriptions, etc. WA basically attempts to show you how to manage a WordPress site, how to get it ranked and options for monetizing it.
My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.
But the main method that WA teaches these days – blogging about your favourite interest in the hope that some people will click your affiliate links and buy stuff – is a long hard road, and one that has a high chance of failure for a lot of people. But if you fail, WA will just say that you gave up too soon. What a convenient get-out clause for WA! If you succeed, WA takes the credit for showing you how to do it. But if you fail, it’s your own fault for giving up to early.

My advice would be to take the money you would spend on WA and invest it in Treehouse. They offer very high-value information across a broad range of topics, from deep dive programming tracks to SEO, plus the community experience there is so much more rewarding. The knowledge and skills you would gain from a Treehouse membership would be worth infinitely more than what you could possibly get out of WA.
I have been with WA since last August and It ha been a really nice leaning experience. The live training is really amazing and it is always up to date on what is going on in the industries. I also love the features that you can write a post in the community and someone that has more experience can stop by and answer your question (god knows I have so many lol 😅) I am happy with the sevice 😀 Great review.
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