21. Facebook – Facebook swap shops are great for selling things locally. It’s like CraigsList, but a little easier. You simply search for swap shops in your area and ask to join the group. Once you’re in, take a picture of the item, write a quick description with the price and post it. It doesn’t get much easier than that. You can generally expect to get about what you would get at a yard sale, maybe a little more.
I agree with EVERY WORD you say here. Having been a member of WA who was acttively trying to mentor new members I discovered that WA mentorship actually does not exist. Not one person who I asked at WA knew who their mentor was, let alone got ANY help from them. Whenever I contacted my up line mentor the reply I always got was the standard reply as above.

Designed to create a huge amount of traffic at all times, these sites focus on building an audience of millions. These websites promote products to their massive audience through the use of banners and contextual affiliate links. This method offers superior exposure and improves conversion rates, resulting in a top-notch revenue for both the seller and the affiliate. 

Individual sellers and companies offering products or services have to deal with their consumers and ensure they are satisfied with what they have purchased. Thanks to the affiliate marketing structure, you’ll never have to be concerned with customer support or customer satisfaction. The entire job of the affiliate marketer is to link the seller with the consumer. The seller deals with any consumer complaints after you receive your commission from the sale.


As Target is the second-largest general retailer in the United States, their affiliate program is primarily for American bloggers or publishers who can route visitors to relevant products. Overall, the program works much like Amazon’s does in that publishers (bloggers) get a small commission on sales, but Target’s gigantic product base (over one million items) and high brand recognition make their affiliate program a great option for influencers.
As far as using WA as a registrar and web host, that is not advisable. As the old saying goes, you never want to have all of your eggs in one basket, and it’s extremely important that you retain complete control over all of the moving parts involved with running an online business, i.e., hosting, domain, dns, email, etc. WA’s hosting services are very canned and restrictive – negating a lot of the flexibility and extensibility which is the beauty of WordPress. As a beginner, you may not recognize these limitations early on, but if you begin to succeed and start looking at ways to improve your online presence, you will undoubtedly realize that WA’s hosting services are less-than-mediocre. Those who are using WA’s hosting and are running successful sites are members who’ve been online for probably 6-8 yrs or more and are deeply indexed.

So, I put together a free master course for you to take that spreads out all of the work involved in starting a blog, into a series of action-packed lessons. My free course breaks the entire process of starting a blog down into an incredibly simple 7-day process for going from 0 to publishing (and promoting) your first blog post in just 1 week. I can't recommend it enough.
I just got on this WA train a few days ago and have already finished the free training of it. After reading numerous posts I think my decision is to not pay for a premium membership and take the info I’ve learned and move on. I have no doubt that I can find valuable resources online just by googling but my question is how do I save my work from WA? I would think they put some sort of block so you can’t as a free member right? Also I read somewhere on these comments that as a free member you cant access your free websites from any other computer unless it’s from there dashboard. I think they do this on purpose as well as another type of pitch to get you to pay for a membership. seems to me that your free websites will never get recognized online for anyone to find you. They have you spend numerous hours building a website that will never get any attention until you pay and by doing this people will be coned into buying into a membership because of all the hard work that will be lost after your free membership expires. I may be wrong about this but its funny that when I try to go to my website from another computer it wont let me in and says I need to sign into my affiliate dashboard and buy a premium membership to view. Kind of like a copyright they put on it until you buy in and they remove the copyright afterwards.
If you don’t like to write, do not sign up for Wealthy Affiliate. The business model that Wealthy Affiliate teaches revolves around producing lots of great content to attract website visitors from search engines. This means, as you build your business, you’ll be writing just about every day, just like I do on this very blog you’re reading. I’ve already written almost 4,000 words in this one post alone, and it’s not even close to being finished yet. Affiliate marketing takes work, and if you are unable or unwilling to write a TON of content, don’t even consider getting into this. Being a writer will end up being your main job.
Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38]
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