On MunchEye you can take a peak at the JV pages for these products, and on those pages they often show what the upsell funnel looks like. Some of them are utterly ridiculous, like you pay £4.99 for the front end product but there are £500 worth of upsells. And this is how affiliates are able to make so much money from these launches, because people get tricked into all these upsells.
I wish I would have read this post before I became a premium member at WA in June 2017. I tried it out for a month but suddenly realized I was doing more to promote WA then I was working on my blogs. I didn’t realize that if you bowed out of premium that basically you could never log back into your WA profile unless you became premium again for life. I couldn’t see paying $49 a month for building blogs where I wouldn’t see any income or very little for quite some time so after one month, I decided to jump ship. My stomach turned afterwards when I realized that I cannot get back to my profile. To this day, I still have people following me on WA and little do they realize that I cannot respond to anything because the owners won’t let me back in.
I’ve been looking all over for a truthful review on WA and you are the only one thus far being totally honest. Everyone is rating it so good because they are members and promoters of WA where they will get a commission if I join. I never join but did the level 1 course and I myself knows its not easy to build a site, get traffic and ranking far more for revenue. My problem with them was their monthly/annual fee. I find it a bit too high and after 1 year if I had subscribe, I don’t think I would have generated revenue to match the annual fee. Many other issue I came across that were similar to what you mention. Thanks alot.
Yes, Craig, and it’s often a case of the blind leading the blind. Often the most active and most helpful members on WA are quite new, and they get enthusiastic about interacting with other members and all helping each other out. So you get a bunch of enthusiastic newbies all giving each other advice even though they don’t really know what they’re talking about.
I’m sure there are people making lots of money from affiliate marketing, but these probably tend to be people doing launch jacking. If you have no conscience and you want to earn lots of money, go for it. I’m sure it’s not actually that difficult to learn. Jeff Lenney has a blog post all about it. By the way, he’s the guy who got taken to court by WA for daring to write a negative review [Craig, feel free to remove that bit if you want].
It was a bit of fun fo a while Marcus but I must admit that I got bored with “The Community” and deliberately engineered my ejection from it. The whole process took a matter of minutes after I got into a live chat and dared them to chuck me out. It was then that I had my wrist slapped for disrespecting a so called “Ambassador”. What a joke! I stated that I have no respect for authority in the real world so that little group meant nothing to me and I would say whatever I like. Didn’t take long for one of them to report me to their god and I then got an on screen message to inform me that Admin had revoked my write access. Really did me a favour as I don’t think it would’ve taken long for real insults to start flying. Some of the long term members there seem to be badly infected with the WA bug and have serious delusions of grandeur. I noticed that a lot have psychological problems and other illnesses which prevent them from having a “proper job” and are not shy to share their personal problems with fellow members.
JVZoo’s strength is that it allows experienced marketers to gain access to product launches and a huge range of online courses while setting up sales funnels and customized landing pages. It’s definitely not for someone who wants to monetize a blog or earn money by having users click through and buy physical products. If you’ve carved out a strong presence online in the marketing space, JVZoo might be a perfect fit.
I’ve been spending over 2 hours reading most of the comments. Great content really although it didn’t really get me any further. I got a yearly paid membership and at least I’ll finish it. Craig, you’ve said since 2015 up to this year you’d write an article about “the alternatives” of WA and sure, you seem like a great guy, but when will i get to read this article? duhh. Some disgusting practices of WA are a huge turn off now but I’m kind of a slow learner and having a community and a step by step way to learn to start an affiliate website is bringing me “from nowhere to finally somewhere” and if you know any platform with a community that can do that better than them then I’d be glad to know which one. Of course thanks to you and other comments I now lower my expectations and know that the faster i’ll be done with the basic there and then feel more self-confident the quicker I’ll leave and go for something more authentic and efficient but what exactly would that be?
But the main method that WA teaches these days – blogging about your favourite interest in the hope that some people will click your affiliate links and buy stuff – is a long hard road, and one that has a high chance of failure for a lot of people. But if you fail, WA will just say that you gave up too soon. What a convenient get-out clause for WA! If you succeed, WA takes the credit for showing you how to do it. But if you fail, it’s your own fault for giving up to early.
Thanks for the reply, but you didn’t really deny my statement that being an affiliate for Wealthy Affiliate is essentially being part of a pyramid scheme. My review was mostly negative though, so I’m not really an affiliate. But why is it that you barely mentioned how you have to struggle to make money via commissions in Wealthy Affiliate? Or how most of the program consists of writing content? Could’ve mentioned how this program is not for people not really interested in writing because you have to be interested and love what you do in order to be committed. You only mentioned that this is not a get rich quick scheme like once, which is cliche nowadays because of that Tai Lopez guy, so people may think that only time is needed, but making money will be a piece of cake. False reassurance essentially. Meanwhile, most members are struggling to make a commission based on the blogs I read. That’s why I will just focus on product reviews and not stress out about writing articles. Lastly, I feel like showing your earnings is not exactly proof, but rather motivation for them to join as they feel like they can make that too, but that only means you keep receiving the earnings to get new people in the future to pay for membership and repeat the cycle.
Hi Amol, You can’t really expect to make it as an affiliate without a blog, e.g., content strategy. You don’t necessarily need to ‘blog’, but you would need to continually add new content – whether it be evergreen content, product pages with detailed descriptions, etc. WA basically attempts to show you how to manage a WordPress site, how to get it ranked and options for monetizing it.

Hi Jamie, awesome content that is very helpful esp with the resources, links and the rich discussions. Want to start e-commerce and blog for money…selling others products, want to go full on with this, tired of the daily routine crunch working for others. I live in a developing country (PNG) that has high internet costs (work still in progress with getting rates down…) so will see how I go with your posts. Any advise? Don’t have a website yet, have to build one I guess….
StudioPress itself is somewhat of a niche product as it is targeted to existing WordPress users who found setting up and managing a WordPress site too difficult or time-consuming. StudioPress prides itself on being easy to use, but their main claim to fame is that their hosted websites are “faster and more secure” than other WordPress hosting companies as well as using the “Genesis framework” which is supposedly more SEO friendly than other WordPress builds.
By quite a large margin Amazon has the largest affiliate marketing program out there, with products from more than 1.5 million sellers. Amazon has the most easy-to-use technology of all the affiliate programs I will be reviewing today. Beginners to affiliate marketing with even the most limited technical expertise will have no problems in getting up and running with the Amazon associates program, while more experienced marketers can create custom tools and websites with the APIs and advanced implementations available to them. The great thing about Amazon is that anything from kids toys to laptops can generate sales if they are purchased through any Amazon affiliate link.

First off, I’m a blogger so it seems wrong not to mention it, but more importantly, it’s a legitimate way to make money. It’s quite possibly the least straight-forward way on this list, but it’s very doable and it’s also quite possibly the funnest way on this list. I love blogging and I know hundreds of bloggers who feel the same. So let’s talk about making money blogging and what it really means.
So, I put together a free master course for you to take that spreads out all of the work involved in starting a blog, into a series of action-packed lessons. My free course breaks the entire process of starting a blog down into an incredibly simple 7-day process for going from 0 to publishing (and promoting) your first blog post in just 1 week. I can't recommend it enough.
Affilorama – While I promoted Affilorama in the past, I no longer do for many reasons. It has simply become too outdated. Affilorama also lacks in some of the training. Instead, they focus on helping you get started quickly by designing a site for you and seeding it with content. Some of the optional training courses they sell are quite expensive and compares to an entire annual membership at Wealthy Affiliate, so that’s why I no longer promote them. Again, they are worth checking out, but I think Wealthy Affiliate is a much better buy.
You also should not join Wealthy Affiliate if you don’t enjoy the community / social aspect of it. A huge part of Wealthy Affiliate is the ability to communicate with other members. It’s a “help and be helped” community. If you have no interest in setting up your profile, asking questions, supporting others, chatting in the live chat sessions, or doing any sort of participation, you will not get the full benefit of the service.

Some merchants run their own (in-house) affiliate programs using dedicated software, while others use third-party intermediaries to track traffic or sales that are referred from affiliates. There are two different types of affiliate management methods used by merchants: standalone software or hosted services, typically called affiliate networks. Payouts to affiliates or publishers can be made by the networks on behalf of the merchant, by the network, consolidated across all merchants where the publisher has a relationship with and earned commissions or directly by the merchant itself.


Amazon and Google are far from your only options for online advertising. Rakuten Linkshare is a great place to search for other affiliates for your ads. Through their program, you can get customized ad links, email links, and banner ads for Starbucks, Walmart, iTunes, and a slew of other popular brands. With this program, you can also find smaller companies, regional or specialized brands, and more. I run a combination of Google, Amazon, and Rakuten’s programs, and my monthly income is approximately $150 from these programs. It’s not a lot of money, but it’s also not a lot of work for residual (it means recurring…since the ads are permanent…) income.
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