When I say that I love Wealthy Affiliate, I’m not just saying that because I’m an affiliate for them. I’m a very active premium member at Wealthy Affiliate and love interacting with people on a daily basis. If you join, you’ll see me posting on people’s profiles, answering questions, chatting in the live chat area, and I have private personal messaging conversations multiple times per day.
If you’ve upgraded to paid, I would request a refund asap. What you’ll find is a community full of aspiring entrepreneurs who are new to internet marketing & website administration – all of whom will be very enthusiastic for about 30-90 days, then never to be heard from again. I could argue that WA’s business model could be called downright predatory given the way they sell this bill of goods.
The phrase, "Affiliates are an extended sales force for your business", which is often used to explain affiliate marketing, is not completely accurate. The primary difference between the two is that affiliate marketers provide little if any influence on a possible prospect in the conversion process once that prospect is directed to the advertiser's website. The sales team of the advertiser, however, does have the control and influence up to the point where the prospect either a) signs the contract, or b) completes the purchase.

Many affiliate programs run with last-click attribution, where the affiliate receiving the last click before the sale gets 100% credit for the conversion. This is changing. With affiliate platforms providing new attribution models and reporting features, you are able to see a full-funnel, cross-channel view of how individual marketing tactics are working together. For example, you might see that a paid social campaign generated the first click, Affiliate X got click 2, and Affiliate Y got the last click. With this full picture, you can structure your affiliate commissions so that Affiliate X gets a percentage of the credit for the sale, even though they didn’t get the last click. 
The difference between Amazon and EBay is that EBay (though still filled with new items) is seen as a used marketplace between individual parties, whereas Amazon (which is filled with offers for new and used merchandise from the 3rd parties) is viewed as a Wal-Mart-type superstore. As a consumer, this difference leads me to use Amazon, so it only makes sense to target on my own demographic.
26. Services – You can offer a paid service, such as life coaching, blog coaching, goal setting or financial planning. Just be sure to investigate all the legal implications and make sure you’re not claiming to be a professional if you’re not one. With a service like this, you’re basically using your blog to sell yourself. You’ll need to convince people that you’re worth buying and then be able to back up your claims once they purchase your service.
However…if you want to be a successful affiliate, don’t pick a broad and flooded vertical like ‘make money online’; instead, choose a niche you’re passionate about. This can be something you already know a lot about, or it can be a topic or product which you’d like to pursue. Either way, it has to be something you’re excited to work on and it has to offer value.
I support bootlegging – I don’t see it as being immoral or unethical in any way. I used to bootleg quite a bit in my youth, and I still do on occasion today (although not yet today in particular, I more meant “in the present”). If you want to hustle for your money, do what you must, baby. Download some software, music, movies, or other assorted digital goodness here and start slangin. It’s not an easy life, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.
Online savings accounts usually come with substantially higher interest rates to help you grow your money faster (regular in-person banks can’t offer rates as high). Banks like CIT Bank and Discover Bank (among other top players in the industry) are great because their interest rates are often over 20 times higher than the national average. That means the money in your savings account will grow 20 times faster than the pace it’s most likely growing at now.
If you’ve got a way with words and expertise in a niche, there are plenty of sites that will pay for articles and content you write. Think of the sites you read regularly. What can you contribute to them that would be interesting? Research your niche and then look for ways to pitch articles. Many sites will simply have a submission or contact link in the footer. To get started, check out my full guide to becoming a freelance writer on the side and then submit your articles to places like Instash, Listverse, TopTenz, A List Apart, International Living, FundsforWriters, and Textbroker.

I remember I use to be a free member but once I saw Kyles own website that compares Swagbucks to Wealthy Affiliate then I knew it was B.S… Comparing a reward site to a “training” site is ridiculous.. Not to mention all the hundreds of fake sites that pretend to review other sites that are in competition with wealthy affiliate and give them bad scores and put wealth affiliate as #1… All the information that they give on their crap website is free on the internet if you know where to look.

Hi, could you give me some advice on how to set up a website elsewhere? I may decide to get my own domain one day and it certainly will not be feasible if I continue on Wealthy Affiliates. Basically, I need a good website to host my website for free for now and also the ability to move my domain over for a small fee if I wish to buy one in the future.
I don’t necessarily regret going with a paid membership, as it satisfied my curiosity about their platform. My intention was to see first-hand if they had any secret sauce to share, but they clearly do not. Wealthy Affiliate is milking a dying business model and I’m willing to bet they are not providing additional value or evolving their ‘curriculum’ to adapt to the ever-changing rules of internet search.
The audiobook industry is booming, yet only 5% of books ever get made into audio format. If you’ve got a background in acting, or if people have said you’ve got a voice made for the radio, you can make extra money recording audio versions of independent and popular books. Sites like ACX connect authors with audiobook performers. So, whether you’re an author looking for more ways to sell your book, or an actor/voice actor looking to make some extra income, you can sell your services online.

I’ve traded my time for money for about the last 10-12 months copyrighting, content marketing, free traffic methods, commenting, finding that community and what not, and now I’m starting to put in more money in front of time by using Ads, leveraging CPA offers, and then fishing more in Facebook Ads, Google, Bing, Instagram, etc. I’ve already made my awareness on Facebook Ads, and now I’m adding more intent by using Google Ads. So,I’m gathering information, pixels to retarget later. Hopefully it gets me somewhere.
Has anyone ever told you you have a voice for radio? Are you great at creating original characters with just your voice? There are tons of people looking to pay for quality voice overs for their corporate videos, animation series, or educational videos. Check out Fiverr and UpWork or create a profile on a specialized site like Voices.com or The Voice Realm to get started making money online doing voice overs.
No matter how good your marketing skills are, you’ll make less money on a bad product than you will on a valuable one. Take the time to study the demand for a product before promoting it. Make sure to research the seller with care before teaming up. Your time is worth a lot, and you want to be sure you’re spending it on a product that is profitable and a seller you can believe in.
StudioPress itself is somewhat of a niche product as it is targeted to existing WordPress users who found setting up and managing a WordPress site too difficult or time-consuming. StudioPress prides itself on being easy to use, but their main claim to fame is that their hosted websites are “faster and more secure” than other WordPress hosting companies as well as using the “Genesis framework” which is supposedly more SEO friendly than other WordPress builds.
JVZoo was founded in 2011 and has since rocketed to near the top as one of the most popular affiliate programs out there. JVZoo is unusual in that there are no upfront costs for either publishers or merchants (advertisers). JVZoo’s income is exclusively from charging fees (to both the merchant and the affiliate) after a sale has been made. It is also unusual in that it pays commissions “instantly” via PayPal rather than once a week/fortnight/month like other affiliate programs.
When I enrolled in WA, I almost immediately had misgivings, which I ignored at first, about two things: 1) using their platform to build sites, as you mentioned, and 2) the bootcamp, which had too much of a circular flavor for my taste – and for my trust. I was actually surprised that so many people would promote WA instead of developing a personal niche. Looking backwards, bootcamp sites are easy to spot: they all have a link at the top called “My #1 Recommendation” or something similar. So much for originality.

Tried to sign up through you on the 19$ discounted premium plan, but when I’ve signed up I was asked to pay the regular price. It’s a bit frustrating to know that I can’t sign up for free (from Philippines) then I was being asked to pay money upfront without even having the option to test it? I’m even willing to pay the discounted price because of all the other reviews I saw on the internet, yours is the most comprehensive one,and it looks legit so I wanted to give it a go, but if this will be the case I have to step back a bit.


I don’t necessarily regret going with a paid membership, as it satisfied my curiosity about their platform. My intention was to see first-hand if they had any secret sauce to share, but they clearly do not. Wealthy Affiliate is milking a dying business model and I’m willing to bet they are not providing additional value or evolving their ‘curriculum’ to adapt to the ever-changing rules of internet search.


What’s really amusing is that when I logged in the other day with my fake account my original account was listed under the heading WA Members Know How To Rank. They are terribly deceitful in many aspects. I also saw a post by a guy who had not received his commissions for three months and sent Kyle a message asking about this. He got a reply saying that Vegas 2019 was going to be a blast, etc. A totally automated and unrelated reply. You can imagine how pissed the dude was.
Join a startup accelerator: Another great option is to apply to a startup accelerator like Y Combinator, 500 startups, or TechStars, where a group of investors will help coach you, connect you with potential partners, and provide startup cash in return for a small stake in your company. The competition is tough to get into these, so don’t rely on them as your only path forward.
There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned.
Because 2Checkout exclusively sells software and digital products, it is best suited for established influencers whose target audience is interested in buying products in this niche. But while you won’t find any physical products for sale, 2Checkout is probably the market leader in selling software of every type, including very specific use case items (like software that can convert Microsoft Word documents to PDF, for instance).

I agree with EVERY WORD you say here. Having been a member of WA who was acttively trying to mentor new members I discovered that WA mentorship actually does not exist. Not one person who I asked at WA knew who their mentor was, let alone got ANY help from them. Whenever I contacted my up line mentor the reply I always got was the standard reply as above.


Promoting WA is a tired and oversaturated niche. They have funneled users into this niche to further their own SEO and to turn their customers into their marketing team, but I believe WA’s best days are far behind them. The lessons they provide are alright, but the tools they give you to work with are pretty bad. For example, there is no way you can use their hosting platform and WordPress installer to set up a successful site. There may be sites which are doing well on their platform, but they were built 6-8 years ago and are well indexed by now. Removing this from the equation significantly lessens the value of their membership.


As a free starter member, you get to “test drive” the Wealthy Affiliate training. You’ll have access to the level 1 training of the certification course and the Affiliate Bootcamp where you’ll learn the process of creating a website, driving traffic to your site, and how to make money with your website. Inside this training, you’ll learn how to start your very first website too!
I think early adopters would have been poised to see more success due to how search algorithms worked back around the time WA launched, in addition to there being a slightly less competitive landscape, but now…good luck. And even if you were to manage to get yourself to page one for a few different longtail WA searches, in the time it took to do that you’d probably have realized there were other more lucrative or interesting opportunities you could have pursued.
Retain some control. If you upload photos of yourself, or friends/family with consent, it's worth going for the 'rights managed' licence option – otherwise you'll have little to no control over how your images are used (eg, you could star in an ad for haemorrhoid cream). See Alamy's page on understanding stock image licensing for more on the different types of licences.
In most blogs I usually skip the post to the end. But your post is one in a million, so I read it from start to finish. I was a member of Wealthy Aff (2007 – 2010, then 2013 -2014). 110% agree with you. It seems that not just the sales letter but thousands of WA members are over praising WA all over the internet, like it will make people money 100% guarantee, while in most cases that just isn’t true. The main method is SEO and thanks to G Panda and Penguin getting ranking takes months and even more time to produce first sale. While it is a good place for beginners, since they walk you through steps like WordPress and important SEO techniques, but it will take time, perhaps years to see result. Which is a problem since WA charges monthly for their training. New members could spend over $500 on WA membership before seeing their first check. Also, I agree with you with the WA Bootcamp part. It misled newbies to promoting back WA while they still fail to make the money. I tried promoting WA myself and it was very hard to make even one sale and even worse, that referral only stayed for 3 months and then cancel his membership. That time I already have experience and made money in other niches. Despite all that, over 100,000++ websites on the internet a promoting WA, especially review sites like onemorecupof-coffee. Those review sites kept bashing other legitimate products like Bring The Fresh and recommending the readers to go for WA instead.
“A pyramid scheme (commonly known as pyramid scams) is a business model that recruits members via a promise of payments or services for enrolling others into the scheme, rather than supplying investments or sale of products or services. As recruiting multiplies, recruiting becomes quickly impossible, and most members are unable to profit; as such, pyramid schemes are unsustainable and often illegal.” 

Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38]

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