Test websites. Remote usability testing means getting paid to navigate a website for the first time and giving feedback to the website owner. Most tests take approximately 15 minutes, and you can get paid up to $10 for each test. A test involves performing a scenario on the client’s website and recording yourself doing it. For example, you might be asked to go through the process of selecting and purchasing an item on a retailer’s website.[1]

Posting ads on Craigslist is technically easy, but people often have fears about posting their personal information on the site. I communicate mostly through email when doing business on Craigslist, and I’ve never run into any issues. I’ve never been ripped off, nor have I been murdered or raped for using the site. It takes common sense, so use your best judgment, but don’t assume someone is a thief just because of their preferred communication method. For an extra bonus, google “funny Craigslist ads” to see some delightful examples of guerilla and grassroots marketing.
I have a question: I need to first register a domain name and on WA it is $13.99 for basic free membership. I’m not going to start with premium until after a lot of tutorials or researching or discovering the site and other sources. I feel that this hesitancy has always been required but a great impediment to my decisions. I’m too play it safe and I don’t know what to do to initiate a good quality blog or endeavor. I’m actually my worst enemy in many things.
2018 TL;DR Update: DO NOT promote Wealthy Affiliate. Sign up for a free trial, engage with the community and learn what you can before your access expires, but DO NOT GO PREMIUM. They are selling a fantasy built on a dying business model which serves only to benefit (no surprise here…) the founders of Wealthy Affiliate. You can glean some value from the trial, but do not invest in their training and by all means do not even consider building out any sites using their proprietary services. If you want to know why, then read on…
Let’s say you have a promotions page where you’re promoting a product via affiliate links. If you currently get 5,000 visits/month at a 2% conversion rate, you have 100 referrals. To get to 200 referrals, you can either focus on getting 5,000 more visitors, or simply increasing the conversion rate to 4%. Which sounds easier? Instead of spending months building domain authority with blogging and guest posts to get more organic traffic, you just have to increase the conversion rate by 2%. This can include landing page optimization, testing your calls-to-action, and having a conversion rate optimization strategy in place. By testing and optimizing your site, you’ll get far better results with much less effort. 

My advice would be to take the money you would spend on WA and invest it in Treehouse. They offer very high-value information across a broad range of topics, from deep dive programming tracks to SEO, plus the community experience there is so much more rewarding. The knowledge and skills you would gain from a Treehouse membership would be worth infinitely more than what you could possibly get out of WA.


If you add up all the services you get, the premium membership is a steal. For example, you’ll notice they include unlimited keyword research with a membership. Other paid keyword research tools sell for $49 or more just by themselves. Add in website hosting, and there’s another $10 / mo. Add on the website security package, and there’s another $10 per month (I’ve paid as much as $29 / mo just for website security). Just based on those things alone, Wealthy Affiliate is a great deal with all of the resources and tools you need in one convenient place. Not to mention all of the training, tutorials, and support that is included with the membership.

Being a current premium member of WA since 2015, active on and off mostly off, but hosting three sites with them, two professional and one monetized, I was expecting to thoroughly disagree with your review; however, I was in many respects surprised and pleased. For the most part, it was insightful and spot-on and while I do see and agree with many of your assertions, I don’t necessarily agree with your conclusion.


The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.

An online business model I love is utilized by GetVoiP, an affiliate marketer based in New York. GetVoiP acts as an agent for business communication providers. They maintain updated listings of VoiP providers, including ratings, comparisons, consumer reviews, in-depth knowledge of market and end-user trends, and expert opinions from business professionals on a variety of topics related to business consumers. By not only keeping abreast of news, but providing detailed analysis of products being offered, GetVoiP is able to generate traffic to their site and increase their clout with businesses.

I tried the WA free trial a couple of years ago and left quite unimpressed. I was particularly disgusted at the “negative review blog” and product bashing tactic that I see being recommended there. In other words, they want you to write negative reviews and trash every single product in the “Internet Marketing/Make Money Online/Biz Opp” niche and then subtly recommend Wealthy Affiliate towards the end of the review post.


Yes, there is a lot to learn. I personally, have been willing to learn and do a lot of research in addition to the courses in WA to gain better understanding of things. I do that because I have the determination to not quit. I have been a member since 2015 and no, I have not had any earnings. However, I also recognize that I still have a lot of work to do and my inability to get some things completed sometimes can keep me from moving forward (like promoting via social media). But, I’m working on my own schedule going at my own pace and that is okay with me.
The implementation of affiliate marketing on the internet relies heavily on various techniques built into the design of many web-pages and websites, and the use of calls to external domains to track user actions (click tracking, Ad Sense) and to serve up content (advertising) to the user. Most of this activity adds time[citation needed] and is generally a nuisance to the casual web-surfer and is seen as visual clutter.[citation needed] Various countermeasures have evolved over time to prevent or eliminate the appearance of advertising when a web-page is rendered. Third party programs (Ad-Aware, Adblock Plus, Spybot, pop-up blockers, etc.) and particularly, the use of a comprehensive HOSTS file can effectively eliminate the visual clutter and the extra time and bandwidth needed to render many web pages. The use of specific entries in the HOSTS file to block these well-known and persistent marketing and click-tracking domains can also aid in reducing a system's exposure to malware by preventing the content of infected advertising or tracking servers to reach a user's web-browser.[citation needed]
My advice would be to take the money you would spend on WA and invest it in Treehouse. They offer very high-value information across a broad range of topics, from deep dive programming tracks to SEO, plus the community experience there is so much more rewarding. The knowledge and skills you would gain from a Treehouse membership would be worth infinitely more than what you could possibly get out of WA.

I have a couple lessons to finish with the bootcamp, and what I’m thinking about doing if I even think about continuing to blog is create a site not around WA but to help others figure out how to make money online, wordpress, how to create a website, select a hosting platform like Hostgator which I had previous experience with before WA, clickfunnels and so forth. But yeah, it’s been real, and an eye opening experience. I’ll likely be transferring my domains back to Hostgator here.
More and more companies and startups especially are embracing remote work—where you use online collaboration and communication tools to do your work from wherever you want. And you don’t have to be a 20-something hotshot designer or coder to reap the benefits of working remotely. Many remote positions are for customer support positions or other customer-facing positions that don’t require specialized skill sets. 

6. IZEA – IZEA works in addition to a blog or on its own. You get paid to blog, tweet, take photos and take videos. The pay is mostly based on your following, so if you want to make money with your tweets, you’ll need to grow you Twitter following.  Likewise, if you want to make money with blogs, you’ll need substantial blog traffic (more on blogging below).

Video is growing like crazy. And more and more people are looking for professional help cutting their raw footage into viral-worthy content. If you have the right software and a bit of skill, you can easily make money online as a video editor. Check out these article of Fstoppers on how to become an online video editor and then look for relevant jobs on Mandy.com, Creative Cow Job Search, or ProductionHub. 

“A pyramid scheme (commonly known as pyramid scams) is a business model that recruits members via a promise of payments or services for enrolling others into the scheme, rather than supplying investments or sale of products or services. As recruiting multiplies, recruiting becomes quickly impossible, and most members are unable to profit; as such, pyramid schemes are unsustainable and often illegal.”
No matter what method you choose to make money online, understand that you might be able to make some money fast, but for the sizable returns, you'll need significant sweat equity. However, a year from now, you'll be happy you started today. Remember, time is far more valuable than money. Focus on creating passive income streams that will free up your time so that you can quit the rat race and focus on the things that matter. 
Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38]
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