Set up the site. Choose a website building platform, such as WordPress, Joomla or Drupal. Next, choose a domain name and web hosting for your site. The domain name is your web address. Web hosting is a service that connects your site to the internet. Once you have your domain name and web hosting, go to the control panel of your hosting account and install your website platform. Design your website by choosing and installing a theme.[9]
Since you’re essentially a freelancer, you get ultimate independence in setting your own goals, redirecting your path when you feel so inclined, choosing the products that interest you, and even determining your own hours. This convenience means you can diversify your portfolio if you like or focus solely on simple and straightforward campaigns. You’ll also be free from company restrictions and regulations as well as ill-performing teams.
To test these websites, you’ll be asked to visit the site in question and record your reactions and thoughts as you go through it. To get started making extra money online by testing websites, sign up for some of the most popular services like UserTesting.com, Userlytics, TryMyUI, Userfeel, TestingTime (for people outside the U.S), or Side Income Jobs.

Learn then selling guidelines. Each marketplace has guidelines that define what you can and cannot sell. State and federal laws also impact what items are prohibited. In general, you cannot sell alcohol, weapons, service contracts, animals or event tickets. Also, while not always prohibited, you may find restrictions on how you can sell items in some categories, such as art, gift cards and coupons.[27] eBay, Craigslist and Amazon publish these guidelines on their websites.

If you want the full story, you can check out my about me page (it’s a pretty cool story if I may say so myself). The short version is that I got started with affiliate marketing back in 2009 and was able to go full-time in 2011. I now own more than a dozen websites in several different niche industries. You can see a listing of most of my sites at RogersConcepts.com.


In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert, because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.


This is a very good question, but it may be better answered if I used it as a new post topic. I need to get back into some sort of routine here anyway, and I am not going to renew my WA membership when it expires tomorrow. I still it can a decent value, but if anyone is really serious about trying to do something in IM, I feel there are better options.

I have a question: I need to first register a domain name and on WA it is $13.99 for basic free membership. I’m not going to start with premium until after a lot of tutorials or researching or discovering the site and other sources. I feel that this hesitancy has always been required but a great impediment to my decisions. I’m too play it safe and I don’t know what to do to initiate a good quality blog or endeavor. I’m actually my worst enemy in many things.


A blog highlights your technical ability and showcases your ability to write blog posts. Your blog can be about different topics than those you write about for your clients. In fact, it should be on a topic that interests you. Visitors will see that you can not only write, but you can also build an online community. A good blog has the potential to earn you many referrals for more clients.[24]
WA feels very like a “cult” to me, not an evil or dangerous one of course. But as soon as i joined ive had 100+ strangers leave me profile comments saying how i will love it there etc. All feels so wishy washy and fake. And over 100 people now following me, really complete strangers wanted to follow ME? I can only assume it’s down to ranking or something is is? It’s like getting 100 strangers rush up hug you and give you a kiss on the cheek, feels very weird..
Sign up for a reputable affiliate network: Aside from Amazon, there are dozens of large reputable affiliate networks, such as Share-A-Sale, Clickbank, and Skimlinks, that specialize in connecting you with merchants who are looking for affiliates to sell their products. They charge relatively low commission fees for the privilege of connecting you with merchants, and the merchants on these sites tend to offer much higher commission percentages or set dollar amount payouts.
Flexoffers is another huge affiliate marketing network. They pay you (the affiliate) a lot faster than others in the industry. It has more than 10 years of experience in the field. While they do not offer anything that is neither groundbreaking nor revolutionary, they do provide a solid array of tools and features that will surely aid you in your campaigns. In addition to the fast payouts, Flexoffers lets you choose from thousands of affiliate programs to promote, offers various content delivery formats, and more.

Anyone who knows how to search for things on Google can uncover more useful information, and in less time, than interacting with the WA support community, which means the only useful things you have access to are the training vids which are passable, but not fantastic. The other selling point with going premium is the higher referral fee, but what good is that if you only sell a handful of WA memberships per year?
I have a paranoid idea, but as a newbie to this world of WA , I have a dark feeling that there’s no reason why WA could not simply read business ideas that are posted in their free membership sites and then copy any of the feasible ideas you’ve researched through their free ‘limited trial’ research tool for keywords. The owners thereby get vast free market research, and snap up any lucrative ideas, and you have no legal ownership of the free site content. Am I paranoid? Would love to get your take, or anyones’s take on this. I didn’t buy a domain, I have as yet not signed up, and have removed my content, – but have I just potentially given my business idea away?
The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.
In 2017, there were almost 90 million pet dogs in the US. Which has opened up a huge opportunity to make money online as a dog watcher or sitter. Specialized sites like Rover or Care.com connect pet owners with pet walkers, sitters, and boarding houses to help look after their best friends when they’re at work or on a trip. If you’re an animal lover, you can make extra money and get to spend some quality time with a furry friend.
I’m sure there are people making lots of money from affiliate marketing, but these probably tend to be people doing launch jacking. If you have no conscience and you want to earn lots of money, go for it. I’m sure it’s not actually that difficult to learn. Jeff Lenney has a blog post all about it. By the way, he’s the guy who got taken to court by WA for daring to write a negative review [Craig, feel free to remove that bit if you want].
If you're ready to enter the ecommerce fray, you could sell your own stuff. Of course, along with selling your own stuff on your own website comes a whole slew of both responsibilities and technical configuration and requirements. For starters, you'll need a website and a hosting account. You'll also need a merchant account like ones offered by Stripe or PayPal. Then you'll need to design that site, build a sales funnel, create a lead magnet and do some email marketing.

Affilorama – While I promoted Affilorama in the past, I no longer do for many reasons. It has simply become too outdated. Affilorama also lacks in some of the training. Instead, they focus on helping you get started quickly by designing a site for you and seeding it with content. Some of the optional training courses they sell are quite expensive and compares to an entire annual membership at Wealthy Affiliate, so that’s why I no longer promote them. Again, they are worth checking out, but I think Wealthy Affiliate is a much better buy.


The lessons can be useful to those just starting out, but I think that their service attracts a lot of misled buyers because of how easy they make it all seem. Sure, you could make some money in affiliate marketing if you follow their training and tutorials and put in an ungodly amount of work. I’m sure of this, but . . . most people who arrive at Wealthy Affiliate will be lucky if they make enough money to pay for their membership.
The power of convincing is defined by your article, I found it very interesting in the many point mention with Wealthy Affiliate. I don’t really think people really don’t understand the power this community can change lives. You are a prime example based on your success report and the affiliate income report that anyone can achieve in owning their own business. I very encourage by your article it has made me think a little harder about what can I do to have my own success story and the answer is Wealthy Affiliate stick with it. I wish you greater success Tony and Thanks again for powerful article!
I realize my bias is already showing through, so I’ll get to what I DON’T like about Wealthy Affiliate below. But, as I’ve already stated, overall I don’t know of any other place that is better for new affiliate marketers to get started than Wealthy Affiliate. If you take a look around my site, you’ll notice I’ve spent a TON of time on it. I’ve spent years of my life building this site, and there are currently almost 500 posts here, all for free, for everyone. It is in my best interest to promote only the best training course and that training course is Wealthy Affiliate.
I appreciate that you recognize that WA is not a scam and definitely provides what is necessary to teach individuals how to create an website for their business and more. I also agree that in their promotion, WA makes it seems to easy, when in fact it requires much hard work. One has to have the desire to work hard to build a business, no matter if it’s brick and mortar or an online business.
LinkConnector is something of a mixed bag, so it’s probably best for experienced affiliates who have become disillusioned with other networks and are looking to expand. LinkConnector’s bizarre mix of high-quality products and a low-quality dashboard make it hard to truly assess its viability, but their exclusive deals with some vendors can make it a true home run for publishers working in certain niches.
The problem with WA is… they don’t put their members through any sort of review process before they let them set off into the world of internet marketing. Sure, they do provide the resources and coaching needed to make it in IM, but they also do a good job of making it sound so easy. I feel like a lot of folks sign up thinking it’s going to be a convenient way to generate income once they know how to post a blog, install a few plugins in WordPress, and get their affiliate links added.
Sound advice indeed Craig. Not sure if you or anyone else has mentioned all the content added by member’s of WA to their blogs all goes towards higher ranking in Google for the WA website. Pick any example of text from any blog, search in Google and guess which site is at the top! More potential clients for WA. I signed up with them several months ago and have remained a free member. After many attempts to get me to go premium they extended the discount offer for the first month indefinitely. I still receive many email notifications from them containing info about new blog posts by their member’s. Seems most of them are dedicated to religion so not really surprising that they keep plodding on with no success. They already have the “faith” mentality.

LinkConnector is something of a mixed bag, so it’s probably best for experienced affiliates who have become disillusioned with other networks and are looking to expand. LinkConnector’s bizarre mix of high-quality products and a low-quality dashboard make it hard to truly assess its viability, but their exclusive deals with some vendors can make it a true home run for publishers working in certain niches.
The 1.4 million members figure doesn’t even make any sense. If WA had 1.4 million active users it would be totally unusable. The “classrooms” there would just be far too busy to keep track of. And aren’t all members automatically set to follow Kyle? According to his WA profile, he has 365,319 friends. So there are 1,034,681 members that don’t follow Kyle?

Learn then selling guidelines. Each marketplace has guidelines that define what you can and cannot sell. State and federal laws also impact what items are prohibited. In general, you cannot sell alcohol, weapons, service contracts, animals or event tickets. Also, while not always prohibited, you may find restrictions on how you can sell items in some categories, such as art, gift cards and coupons.[27] eBay, Craigslist and Amazon publish these guidelines on their websites.

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