LinkConnector is something of a mixed bag, so it’s probably best for experienced affiliates who have become disillusioned with other networks and are looking to expand. LinkConnector’s bizarre mix of high-quality products and a low-quality dashboard make it hard to truly assess its viability, but their exclusive deals with some vendors can make it a true home run for publishers working in certain niches.

One thing I didn’t like is that they give no guidance as to what constitutes a good niche. They imply, if they don’t say it outright, that you can make money out of any niche, you just have to choose one you’re passionate about and money will necessarily follow. I wholeheartedly disagree. Let’s take an example. If I’m passionate about, say, jigsaw puzzles, does that make them a good niche? Sure, there are such products sold on the net and probably you can earn commissions from them, but 1) this is the sort of things people will more likely buy at brick and mortar stores, 2) most of them are not expensive enough to make significant commissions from them, and 3) most importantly, if, as they say, you must first give value and help people, how can you write tens of posts that will “help” people about jigsaw puzzles? I for one would run out of ideas before having used all fingers of one hand. And that’s also why I disagree with their suggestion to select very narrow niches. One can only write so much about so little.


In April 2008 the State of New York inserted an item in the state budget asserting sales tax jurisdiction over Amazon.com sales to residents of New York, based on the existence of affiliate links from New York–based websites to Amazon.[45] The state asserts that even one such affiliate constitutes Amazon having a business presence in the state, and is sufficient to allow New York to tax all Amazon sales to state residents. Amazon challenged the amendment and lost at the trial level in January 2009. The case is currently making its way through the New York appeals courts.
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