If you’ve upgraded to paid, I would request a refund asap. What you’ll find is a community full of aspiring entrepreneurs who are new to internet marketing & website administration – all of whom will be very enthusiastic for about 30-90 days, then never to be heard from again. I could argue that WA’s business model could be called downright predatory given the way they sell this bill of goods.

It is you who has to put hard work. Which in life is easy? This is freedom and financial freedom. It can never be cheap? It needs lots of passion and strict discipline for success. The training is excellent and there is help available always. This is probably one of the cheapest programs in In industry unless you bye pieces and do yourself. An 18-year-old guy has got >300 referrals and showed the amount he is making in 3 years.

I just got on this WA train a few days ago and have already finished the free training of it. After reading numerous posts I think my decision is to not pay for a premium membership and take the info I’ve learned and move on. I have no doubt that I can find valuable resources online just by googling but my question is how do I save my work from WA? I would think they put some sort of block so you can’t as a free member right? Also I read somewhere on these comments that as a free member you cant access your free websites from any other computer unless it’s from there dashboard. I think they do this on purpose as well as another type of pitch to get you to pay for a membership. seems to me that your free websites will never get recognized online for anyone to find you. They have you spend numerous hours building a website that will never get any attention until you pay and by doing this people will be coned into buying into a membership because of all the hard work that will be lost after your free membership expires. I may be wrong about this but its funny that when I try to go to my website from another computer it wont let me in and says I need to sign into my affiliate dashboard and buy a premium membership to view. Kind of like a copyright they put on it until you buy in and they remove the copyright afterwards.


But, I think the return on your investment has a lot to do with each individual. It takes some people 6 months to earn, some a year and some 2 or more years. There are many variables that can come into play as to why a person is not seeing any earnings and they all can’t to put on the shoulders of WA. WA provides what you need to get the business started, but the effort one puts into to getting a business where it needs to be must come from the individual. Like they say, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink!”
Thanks for the reply, but you didn’t really deny my statement that being an affiliate for Wealthy Affiliate is essentially being part of a pyramid scheme. My review was mostly negative though, so I’m not really an affiliate. But why is it that you barely mentioned how you have to struggle to make money via commissions in Wealthy Affiliate? Or how most of the program consists of writing content? Could’ve mentioned how this program is not for people not really interested in writing because you have to be interested and love what you do in order to be committed. You only mentioned that this is not a get rich quick scheme like once, which is cliche nowadays because of that Tai Lopez guy, so people may think that only time is needed, but making money will be a piece of cake. False reassurance essentially. Meanwhile, most members are struggling to make a commission based on the blogs I read. That’s why I will just focus on product reviews and not stress out about writing articles. Lastly, I feel like showing your earnings is not exactly proof, but rather motivation for them to join as they feel like they can make that too, but that only means you keep receiving the earnings to get new people in the future to pay for membership and repeat the cycle. 

Many affiliate programs run with last-click attribution, where the affiliate receiving the last click before the sale gets 100% credit for the conversion. This is changing. With affiliate platforms providing new attribution models and reporting features, you are able to see a full-funnel, cross-channel view of how individual marketing tactics are working together. For example, you might see that a paid social campaign generated the first click, Affiliate X got click 2, and Affiliate Y got the last click. With this full picture, you can structure your affiliate commissions so that Affiliate X gets a percentage of the credit for the sale, even though they didn’t get the last click. 
There are SO MANY success stories on Wealthy Affiliate, these are just some of the ones I found. One thing you’ll notice is that most of these success stories are NOT making money by promoting Wealthy Affiliate. They are promoting an array of other products and services. Wealthy Affiliate teaches you how to promote nearly any product or service in nearly any industry. That’s the beauty of it. Wealthy Affiliate does offer a fantastic affiliate program (which I am a part of), but there are so many other things you can promote once you go through the training.
More and more companies and startups especially are embracing remote work—where you use online collaboration and communication tools to do your work from wherever you want. And you don’t have to be a 20-something hotshot designer or coder to reap the benefits of working remotely. Many remote positions are for customer support positions or other customer-facing positions that don’t require specialized skill sets.
Tutor students. Many families prefer the flexibility of using an online tutor. Depending on your background, you could be simply helping a child with homework or providing college-level support. You need to have your own computer and high speed internet. Experience required differs among companies. Some require “strong experience,” while others require a specific educational background. However, most companies do require a college degree.
Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38]
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