My subscription with wa ended 11/28. I was told I would have 30 days to move the site after my membership expired I still have 16 days left. Prior to cancellation I asked tech support and people on the live chat and all confirmed I would have 30 days to move the site. At first I could not even figure out how to login but I figured out a way around their platform and was able to access admin to my site. NOBODY TOLD ME i WOULD BE BLOCKED FROM DOWNLOADING THE PLUGIN TO BACK UP THE SITE.
As a quick follow up, I just received exactly the same email from WA regarding the second free website that I built a little while after joining as a free member. Also received several emails from them promoting their Black Friday offer of discounted membership. The price was a bit more realistic but still wouldn’t encourage anyone with an ounce of common sense to sign up. Incidentally, it seems that as I am still a free member, I am still able to have 2 free websites which I can create at my leisure. 😂

20. Etsy – If you like to create arts and crafts, you can sell them on Etsy.It’s completely free to open an Etsy store. You simply sign up, post pictures of your creations and starting selling. You can choose your payment option, but PayPal is generally the easiest. Etsy makes it easy to sell and keep track of your inventory. There is a small listing fee and they take 3.5% of every sale you make.
My advice would be to take the money you would spend on WA and invest it in Treehouse. They offer very high-value information across a broad range of topics, from deep dive programming tracks to SEO, plus the community experience there is so much more rewarding. The knowledge and skills you would gain from a Treehouse membership would be worth infinitely more than what you could possibly get out of WA.
Two-tier programs exist in the minority of affiliate programs; most are simply one-tier. Referral programs beyond two-tier resemble multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing but are different: Multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing associations tend to have more complex commission requirements/qualifications than standard affiliate programs.[citation needed]
Next, you need to set up and build your YouTube channel. Your YouTube channel is your homebase for all your content. If you already have a Google account for Gmail or Google Drive, then you can use that to log-in to YouTube and start setting up your channel. Pick a username that works for you and is memorable (if you’re using an existing Google account you’ll have to edit your username in Google+).

Every year, hundreds of millions of documents are notarized in the United States: wills, mortgages, citizenship forms, handgun applications. While for decades, this has all been done in person, there is a budding crop of sites that allow notaries to take their services online. If you’re already a notary, you can sell your services online. Or, if you want to get started, check out the National Notary’s checklist for becoming a certified notary.
Etsy: While Etsy's popularity has declined recently, it's still a great resource for selling handmade items online. No need for complex ecommerce sites or merchant accounts or any sort of automation. The company takes a commission of every sale and charges a small listing fee per item. But many still use Etsy as their primary source of income. The best part is that you can also sell digital products on here such as poster designs. 
Good news is, Wealthy Affiliate goes on to say that within the first few lessons you’re going to learn the techniques that will allow you to get an abundance, no wait…ABUNDANCE of relevant customers to your site by way of organic search. Most folks reading this have no idea just how difficult this is. If you know how to do it, then it’s mainly just hard work, but for those of you that don’t understand the process…you’re in for a long education full of trial and error.
I know what you mean. Regularly writing lots of content and getting not much in return, it’s a hard road to go down. And the thing is, if you are able to write lots of content and you want to earn money doing it, you can join Textbroker and get paid per article. I know it’s not residual income, but it gives you a better return on your time up front.
Many affiliate programs run with last-click attribution, where the affiliate receiving the last click before the sale gets 100% credit for the conversion. This is changing. With affiliate platforms providing new attribution models and reporting features, you are able to see a full-funnel, cross-channel view of how individual marketing tactics are working together. For example, you might see that a paid social campaign generated the first click, Affiliate X got click 2, and Affiliate Y got the last click. With this full picture, you can structure your affiliate commissions so that Affiliate X gets a percentage of the credit for the sale, even though they didn’t get the last click. 
Tom, I think they’re business model is based upon luring in the non-internet-savvy desperate unemployed worker and the retiree. It is a shame that they’ve been able to continue extorting money from folks, but in time they’re pump and dump scheme will eventually be exhausted. More social proof of their racket will emerge on blogs and social media, and they’re ownership over the search results for ‘wealthy affiliate review’, ‘wealthy affiliate scam’, etc, etc…will begin to slip. As Google and search continues to mature and evolve, their dying business model will continue to erode.
The support in there is really hit and miss, which can be a bummer, as the quality of response you receive can vary greatly depending upon who replies, and it’s seldom you’ll get much from either of the head muckity mucks. They profess to be active in the community chat, but often times it’s a lot of “hey, great job…keep up the good work and you’ll be making money in no time” kind of fluff. Be prepared to do some Googling when you have a question.
In April 2008 the State of New York inserted an item in the state budget asserting sales tax jurisdiction over Amazon.com sales to residents of New York, based on the existence of affiliate links from New York–based websites to Amazon.[45] The state asserts that even one such affiliate constitutes Amazon having a business presence in the state, and is sufficient to allow New York to tax all Amazon sales to state residents. Amazon challenged the amendment and lost at the trial level in January 2009. The case is currently making its way through the New York appeals courts.
×