It’s a very clever con: Tell all members that WA is the best way to make money online, tell them to tell the whole world that too, get them to all help each other in the hope of some kind of reward, and suppress any negativity. What you end up with then is a site that appears on first look to be the best thing that has ever happened to anyone wanting to make lots of money online, but which in reality turns out to be a big disappointment.

Bullseye Brian and I’m happy that you were entertained for a while. Looks like the “Ambassador” put a stop to my little experiment. However it confirmed my suspicions that you don’t need an IQ of 130 to be a member of WA. I would’ve thought that most people would recognize a name like HughJarse as a potential troll and leave well alone. However it seems to make no difference with that lot as they all appear to be brainwashed by the cult of “Wealthy Affiliate”. It looks very similar to most religion which I suspect maybe the key to their success.
That being said, LinkConnector’s platform looks and feels outdated and is rather clumsily designed. Their dashboard also makes it difficult to find “hot” products or compare conversion rates, leaving affiliates somewhat in the dark about which products to choose. Ironically, despite their low-quality website, they offer some of the best customer service in the affiliate space.
I have been looking through a lot of your website and blogs and i am quite impressed by your knowledge of blogging and the internet in general. I too was a member of W A but i moved out because i found myself restrained by all their rules and other restrictions. One thing i will mention in their favour is that their platform is already equipped with the use of WordPress. I have been scouting around and i have discovered that in order to use WordPress on other hosting platforms you have to first download, then upload to the hosting platform following a complicated procedure. Can you give any information where there is anywhere that wordpress is available without a load of technical procedure.
If that sounds like too much technical information for you, there is an easy button – Google’s advertising platform is as simple as signing up, enabling (on Blogger) or pasting a small code on your website, and allowing the advertisements to automatically roll in. The problem with this program is that you don’t get any commissions – and you don’t get to control the ad content. This is useful for some, but powerful users will want something a little more robust.

Websites consisting mostly of affiliate links have previously held a negative reputation for underdelivering quality content. In 2005 there were active changes made by Google, where certain websites were labeled as "thin affiliates".[34] Such websites were either removed from Google's index or were relocated within the results page (i.e., moved from the top-most results to a lower position). To avoid this categorization, affiliate marketer webmasters must create quality content on their websites that distinguishes their work from the work of spammers or banner farms, which only contain links leading to merchant sites.
Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38] 
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