“I only ask you this because you made the above comment “there is no way you can use their hosting platform and WordPress installer to set up a successful site. There may be sites which are doing well on their platform, but they were built 6-8 years ago and are well indexed by now. Removing this from the equation significantly lessens the value of their membership.”
Always disclose your affiliate relationship. Most visitors will probably understand that graphic ad will lead to your getting paid, but if you write a review or use an in-text link as a recommendation, you want your readers to know that may lead to compensation as well. This ensures you retain transparency and trust with your readers, but also, it's required by the FTC's endorsement rules.
It’s really advisable to register any domain outside of wealthy affiliate and also ensure that you have a full backup of your site stored somewhere else in case of any problems. It seems that members can only use WordPress to build a website which I feel is a bit limited. There is a big world outside WordPress and they could teach so much more than just building a site with one platform. There may me a few making money from their sites at wa but would certainly be a small minority. Many claim to be doing very well but if you bother to really check them out, most are doing very little and have low traffic.

Better yet, you can even upload your own book to one of the world’s largest book sellers: Amazon. With Amazon self-publishing, you set the price, retain the rights to your book, and get access to Amazon’s massive audience. For every sale, you keep 70% with Amazon taking the remainder as a fee. If you want to get started, check out Leslie Samuel's great guide to selling eBooks online or follow Tara Gentile on CreativeLive as she shows you how to use your existing body of work to write an eBook within the next week. Who knows, you might just write one of the best business books of this year!


Affiliate marketing is a very large industry and has become a key source of online income for many thousands of professional bloggers. With more and more online businesses becoming involved in affiliate marketing, more opportunities have arisen for bloggers, like you and I, to make money with their blog. and to ultimately create passive income streams.
After wasting a solid two hours going over their model and deciding whether or not to give it a shot, I have come to this conclusion: what they are trying to get you to believe is that all you do is click a few buttons, give ‘em access to your checking account, and you will be able to move to Belize and languish on the beach forever while your website deposits a couple grand into your bank account automatically every month. Who WOULDN’T want that job?
Can you run a successful business by only using the free membership option at Wealthy Affiliate? Well, you can, but I wouldn’t recommend it. Instead, I recommend you sign up for the free Wealthy Affiliate membership as a way to try things out. Honestly, the free membership is set up to be a bit of a teaser to get you to sign up for premium eventually, but most of us expect that going in. What’s nice about it is you can judge for yourself, based on the free membership, whether it is worth it for you to sign up for premium. Ultimately, only you can decide if Wealthy Affiliate is high quality or not. You will get more than enough of an idea by signing up for their free membership option. On average, about 1 in every eight people upgrade to a premium membership.
Yeah except I would be telling the truth! They are really nice and good about responding as long as their hand is in your bank account. I have sent 8 emails over the last few weeks and no response. I work 14 hour days and if I had known they would pull this I would have taken time off to get the site moved- I went through the training there but I couldn’t get past the idea of posting reviews for products I have never tried. It seems like that is their method and I personally find it despicable. They clearly are not an honest company. I found most of the education there to be really basic and the live chat is basically just the blind leading the blind. There seems to be a quiet desperation among many the members. It is clear not many are making decent money but are afraid to complain for fear of being banished. Anyone that wants the straight scoop on this company should go look at the ripoff reports. They just lost a big lawsuit for their fraudulent practices and it may well put them and all the affilliates that posted fraudulent reviews out of business. Apparently the judge in the case is pretty disgusted with them and they are saying he may order all the fake reviews be removed on top of paying damages to the companies whose reputation they have harmed so there goes their marketing plan. What they did to me was reprehensible. I was a member for over 2 years and they got $600 out of me. What a waste of money! Telling me I would have 30 days to move the site and then blocking my permissions so I cannot is fraud. I plan to spread the word. You better believe this will be the most expensive $50 they ever stole.

On MunchEye you can take a peak at the JV pages for these products, and on those pages they often show what the upsell funnel looks like. Some of them are utterly ridiculous, like you pay £4.99 for the front end product but there are £500 worth of upsells. And this is how affiliates are able to make so much money from these launches, because people get tricked into all these upsells.
In April 2008 the State of New York inserted an item in the state budget asserting sales tax jurisdiction over Amazon.com sales to residents of New York, based on the existence of affiliate links from New York–based websites to Amazon.[45] The state asserts that even one such affiliate constitutes Amazon having a business presence in the state, and is sufficient to allow New York to tax all Amazon sales to state residents. Amazon challenged the amendment and lost at the trial level in January 2009. The case is currently making its way through the New York appeals courts.
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