A blog highlights your technical ability and showcases your ability to write blog posts. Your blog can be about different topics than those you write about for your clients. In fact, it should be on a topic that interests you. Visitors will see that you can not only write, but you can also build an online community. A good blog has the potential to earn you many referrals for more clients.[24]
Why do you want to get into affiliate marketing? Is it solely to make money? Do you have a desire (or already possess the skills required) to build a website that people will want to visit, learn from, purchase from, etc? Are you willing to build the best website imaginable for your chosen vertical? What skills can you contribute and do you have any leverage points that could make you competitive, e.g., writing, web design, seo, video creation, free time, and/or a strong desire to learn and work hard?

I realize my bias is already showing through, so I’ll get to what I DON’T like about Wealthy Affiliate below. But, as I’ve already stated, overall I don’t know of any other place that is better for new affiliate marketers to get started than Wealthy Affiliate. If you take a look around my site, you’ll notice I’ve spent a TON of time on it. I’ve spent years of my life building this site, and there are currently almost 500 posts here, all for free, for everyone. It is in my best interest to promote only the best training course and that training course is Wealthy Affiliate.
As a free starter member, you get to “test drive” the Wealthy Affiliate training. You’ll have access to the level 1 training of the certification course and the Affiliate Bootcamp where you’ll learn the process of creating a website, driving traffic to your site, and how to make money with your website. Inside this training, you’ll learn how to start your very first website too!
In April 2008 the State of New York inserted an item in the state budget asserting sales tax jurisdiction over Amazon.com sales to residents of New York, based on the existence of affiliate links from New York–based websites to Amazon.[45] The state asserts that even one such affiliate constitutes Amazon having a business presence in the state, and is sufficient to allow New York to tax all Amazon sales to state residents. Amazon challenged the amendment and lost at the trial level in January 2009. The case is currently making its way through the New York appeals courts.
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