888.com is a premium gaming destination and a well established name in the casino and poker circuit. Its site offers numerous sub-brands including 888sport, 888ladies, 888bingo, 888casino and 888poker, as well as ReefClub Casino. The 888 family of companies attract millions of players, and the company provides affiliates with frequent promotions to keep players interested.
One thing I didn’t like is that they give no guidance as to what constitutes a good niche. They imply, if they don’t say it outright, that you can make money out of any niche, you just have to choose one you’re passionate about and money will necessarily follow. I wholeheartedly disagree. Let’s take an example. If I’m passionate about, say, jigsaw puzzles, does that make them a good niche? Sure, there are such products sold on the net and probably you can earn commissions from them, but 1) this is the sort of things people will more likely buy at brick and mortar stores, 2) most of them are not expensive enough to make significant commissions from them, and 3) most importantly, if, as they say, you must first give value and help people, how can you write tens of posts that will “help” people about jigsaw puzzles? I for one would run out of ideas before having used all fingers of one hand. And that’s also why I disagree with their suggestion to select very narrow niches. One can only write so much about so little.

However, like anything else truly worthwhile, apps require a significant investment of your time or money upfront. If you don't have the skills, then you have to hire someone who can assist you in creating a great app. But first you need to come up with an idea that will sell. Do the proper market research and analytics to come up with the right app.
With Wealthy Affiliate they have so many multiple streams of income to where their money comes in from- the hosting, the referral program, jaaxy, the premium accounts, the illusions of all the community help that is spectacular, the writing of reviews that will promote WA and make them stand out in search engines, and social media, etc. I mean, the goal is to first help people and then make money in the process, but many of these people fail at #2. What the heck should I be writing content for to just make it a hobby and never get payed for? It’s more so a waste of my time, and I’d be crazy.

I realize my bias is already showing through, so I’ll get to what I DON’T like about Wealthy Affiliate below. But, as I’ve already stated, overall I don’t know of any other place that is better for new affiliate marketers to get started than Wealthy Affiliate. If you take a look around my site, you’ll notice I’ve spent a TON of time on it. I’ve spent years of my life building this site, and there are currently almost 500 posts here, all for free, for everyone. It is in my best interest to promote only the best training course and that training course is Wealthy Affiliate. 

The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.

My next self-funded business hit $160,000 in revenue in its first year alone. After that first taste of self-made success, I’ve gone on to sign consulting contracts worth tens of thousands of dollars with startups like LinkedIn and Google, launch profitable online courses, and build a following of hundreds of thousands for this blog and my podcast series.
Commercial use requires 'releases' - editorial use doesn't. Stock photos can be sold for commercial (eg, marketing) or editorial (ie, journalistic) use. You'll have more opportunities to make cash if your photos are available for both, but photos containing people or property (including branding and logos) need signed releases to be sold commercially.
If you have anything you want to sell, then EBay is the place you need to seriously consider doing it first. Personally I’m not a fan of the site because of the work it takes to build up a reputation. If you’re willing to grind through that process, you’ll be rewarded with many privileges – people have gotten rich selling books about how they got rich selling everything on EBay: Click here for a few tips from the pros.
As the years passed they moved more towards the blogging model and the concept that anyone can build a business by blogging about whatever they are most interested in. This approach is far more long-winded and very hit-and-miss in terms of how likely people are to succeed. Sure, some people will eventually find great success if their chosen topic happens to be a profitable niche and they are good at writing and stick it out for long enough. For many others it will not go beyond being a hobby site that pays a bit of spare change. No need to sign up to Wealthy Affiliate to do that. Just throw up a free blog at Blogspot.com, write about what you’re interested in, and throw in some affiliate links here and there. It’s not rocket science, folks.
Some useful advice there Marcus. It really is easy for anyone to set up a blog these days and there are many platforms to choose from. Of course WordPress itself is probably the most popular and not difficult to understand. I recently set up a few just for the backlink value and found that Strikingly was probably the most straightforward to set up. As I linked to my regular blog it was listed in Google within a few days. Totally free and as good if not better than the free websites that are dished out by WA. If you feel the need for community support, there are many groups on Facebook that won’t cost you a cent!
But the main method that WA teaches these days – blogging about your favourite interest in the hope that some people will click your affiliate links and buy stuff – is a long hard road, and one that has a high chance of failure for a lot of people. But if you fail, WA will just say that you gave up too soon. What a convenient get-out clause for WA! If you succeed, WA takes the credit for showing you how to do it. But if you fail, it’s your own fault for giving up to early.
Anyone who knows how to search for things on Google can uncover more useful information, and in less time, than interacting with the WA support community, which means the only useful things you have access to are the training vids which are passable, but not fantastic. The other selling point with going premium is the higher referral fee, but what good is that if you only sell a handful of WA memberships per year?
Affilorama – While I promoted Affilorama in the past, I no longer do for many reasons. It has simply become too outdated. Affilorama also lacks in some of the training. Instead, they focus on helping you get started quickly by designing a site for you and seeding it with content. Some of the optional training courses they sell are quite expensive and compares to an entire annual membership at Wealthy Affiliate, so that’s why I no longer promote them. Again, they are worth checking out, but I think Wealthy Affiliate is a much better buy.
There are many ways to get people onto your list. Lead magnets are one such resource. For example, you can build ebooks, checklists and cheat sheets. But you can also do content upgrades, such as PDF versions of an article with added resources in them, four-part video training series, and more. Think about your audience and what you can offer them to better serve them, then treat them with some respect and you'll eventually reap the rewards.
There’s also the fact that Wealthy Affiliate is not and never claims to be a get-rich-quick strategy. You will learn how to build a real, legitimate online business and one that can earn you some serious cash, but just like any other business, it is going to take a lot of time, effort, patience, and support along the way. If you have realistic expectations, are willing to learn from those who have succeeded before you, and you’re willing to put at least 6 months into your business before you see any profits at all, then Wealthy Affiliate is a good place for you.
This has become a popular business model for online entrepreneurs over the past several years, and will probably just continue to grow in popularity. The best thing about selling online courses is that once you do the up-front work in creating the course and setting up your marketing strategy, you can get paid over and over again for work you do once.
In February 2000, Amazon announced that it had been granted a patent[18] on components of an affiliate program. The patent application was submitted in June 1997, which predates most affiliate programs, but not PC Flowers & Gifts.com (October 1994), AutoWeb.com (October 1995), Kbkids.com/BrainPlay.com (January 1996), EPage (April 1996), and several others.[13]
Since you’re essentially a freelancer, you get ultimate independence in setting your own goals, redirecting your path when you feel so inclined, choosing the products that interest you, and even determining your own hours. This convenience means you can diversify your portfolio if you like or focus solely on simple and straightforward campaigns. You’ll also be free from company restrictions and regulations as well as ill-performing teams.

I would also like to see a forum built into the platform. Wealthy Affiliate has a unique way of building a community and I understand why they shy away from a standard forum type of format. Instead, they want to promote live chat sessions, blog posts, private messaging, and public questions where people can comment below. This type of setup is pretty cool at times, but I also do enjoy forums where I can just browse by topic.


Here are some additional pictures from the conference. This first picture is from the Wynn Hotel. Kyle and Carson, the owners of Wealthy Affiliate, rented out an incredible 2 story suite for us to party in. They had top shelf drinks, entertainment, mouth-watering food, and we were simply treated like ballers. Networking and making connections with these other successful affiliate marketers was invaluable. 
×